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Seminars & Lectures

Renmin Business School is a world class business school that bridges both academia and industry.  We invite leading academics and industry experts to give guest lectures and seminars on a regular basis, through which students learn about frontier research findings and exciting new developments in the business community.

1. Daily Driving Commute Stressors and Transformational Leader Behaviors: A Daily Diary Study

Speaker: Jingjing MA (Michigan State University)

Abstract: Recent research has shown that there is considerable within-person variance in leadership behaviors that cannot be explained by chronic individual differences. Unfortunately, we lack sufficient understanding of dynamic, transient factors that may impact daily leader behaviors. In this presentation, I will present a daily diary study drawing from ego depletion theory that investigated relations of managers' commute stressors and depletion with transformational behaviors. The study found that managers' daily commute stressors were associated with increases in morning depletion. These increases in depletion were, in turn, associated with a lower likelihood of exhibiting transformational leader behaviors that day for managers who believed that willpower is a limited resource. However, this detrimental effect of depletion was avoided for managers who believed that willpower is not a limited resource. As time allows, I will also briefly discuss my dissertation.

About the Speaker: Jingjing MA (PhD candidate, Michigan State University)

2. Convex Bounds Approximation Method for Risk Aggregations with Applications in Option Pricing and Capital Allocation

Speaker: Yao Jing(Heriot-Watt University)

Abstract: In this talk, I briefly introduce an approximation method based on convex bounds for the applications related with risk aggregation. In particular, I shall talk about the applications of this method in Asian option pricing, basket option pricing, spread option pricing and capital allocation problem under risk additive models. Numerical results are presented to show that this approximation method is accurate, efficient and robust.

3. Authoritarian Rule and Corporate Social Performance

Speaker: Wenzhen Lv

Abstract: To explain corporate social performance (CSP) activities across emerging economies, we draw on recent research regarding institutional differences among political regimes. We argue that whether a country possesses a heterogeneous legislature will influence firms’ CSP because: (1) it influences the scope of private agreements that firms can strike with other stakeholders; and (2) it is related to the extent of state ownership of the corporate sector which influences CSP. We therefore predict CSP will be lowest for firms located in non-competitive authoritarian regimes followed by semi-competitive authoritarian regimes and then democracies. Using a sample of 21,505 firm-year observations representing 2,484 unique firms from 54 countries over the period 2002–2014, we find support for our argument. 

4. Good on paper: How the Medium of Action Influences Self-Control

Speaker: Lili Wang(Zhejiang University)

Abstract: The present research explores the effect of using paper (vs. digital device) as a medium of action on self-control. We find that consumers perceive their actions on paper (vs. a digital device) as more as self-diagnostic and thus are more likely to exercise self-control for action performed on paper.

5. Convex Bounds Approximation Method for Risk Aggregations with Applications in Option Pricing and Capital Allocation

Speaker: Yao Jing

Abstract: In this talk, I briefly introduce an approximation method based on convex bounds for the applications related with risk aggregation. In particular, I shall talk about the applications of this method in Asian option pricing, basket option pricing, spread option pricing and capital allocation problem under risk additive models. Numerical results are presented to show that this approximation method is accurate, efficient and robust.

6. Sizes Are Gendered: The Effect of Size Cues in Brand Names on Brand Stereotyping

Speaker: Shaobo Li(Southern University of Science and Technology)

Abstract: The use of size cues in brand names (e.g., Mini Cooper, Xiaomi) is increasingly common in the industry. However, despite its prevalence, scant research has investigated whether and how the use of such size cues influence consumers’ perception. In the current research, we hypothesize that size cues in brand names can evoke gender associations, which subsequently affect consumer perceptions toward the warmth and competence of the target brand. Across different product categories and cultural contexts, we provide converging evidence that brands with a size cue of smallness (bigness) in the name are perceived to be warmer but less competent (less warm but more competent), and this effect is mediated by the gender association evoked by the semantic size cues. Further, we show that the downstream consequence of size cues in brand names on overall brand evaluation depends on the relative importance of warmth and competence in the consumption context. Specifically, size cue of smallness (bigness) in brand names leads to more favorable brand evaluations when consumers have a communal (agentic) goal and when the brand has a feminine (masculine) gender positioning.

7. Earnings Informativeness and Overnight Return at Earnings Announcement: Evidence from China

Speaker: Zhang Ran(Peking University)

Abstract: We examine earnings informativeness of Chinese A-share market and find that Chinese A-share market is analogous to the U.S. market in terms of earnings value relevance and market responses to earnings information. More importantly, with the uniqueness of information disclosure and trading regulation, we show a striking phenomenon that overnight return at earnings announcement reacts efficiently to earnings and conveys relevant information for firm’s future fundamentals and stock return performances while intraday response solely adds noises to overall market response to earnings.  A long-short strategy based on this effect yields monthly alpha of 91.3 basis points.  Further analyses indicate that the phenomenon exists in other informational events such as management forecasts of earnings, and that the phenomenon is more pronounced in stocks that are associated with more retail investor trading.  Our results collectively support the usefulness of earnings in China and highlight the importance of the information conveyed by overnight trading in the unique setting.

8. Good on paper: How the Medium of Action Influences Self-Control

Speaker: Lili Wang

Abstract: The present research explores the effect of using paper (vs. digital device) as a medium of action on self-control. We find that consumers perceive their actions on paper (vs. a digital device) as more as self-diagnostic and thus are more likely to exercise self-control for action performed on paper.

9. Sizes Are Gendered: The Effect of Size Cues in Brand Names on Brand Stereotyping

Speaker: Shaobo Li(Southern University of Science and Technology)

Abstract: The use of size cues in brand names (e.g., Mini Cooper, Xiaomi) is increasingly common in the industry. However, despite its prevalence, scant research has investigated whether and how the use of such size cues influence consumers’ perception. In the current research, we hypothesize that size cues in brand names can evoke gender associations, which subsequently affect consumer perceptions toward the warmth and competence of the target brand. Across different product categories and cultural contexts, we provide converging evidence that brands with a size cue of smallness (bigness) in the name are perceived to be warmer but less competent (less warm but more competent), and this effect is mediated by the gender association evoked by the semantic size cues. Further, we show that the downstream consequence of size cues in brand names on overall brand evaluation depends on the relative importance of warmth and competence in the consumption context. Specifically, size cue of smallness (bigness) in brand names leads to more favorable brand evaluations when consumers have a communal (agentic) goal and when the brand has a feminine (masculine) gender positioning.

 

10. Earnings Informativeness and Overnight Return at Earnings Announcement: Evidence from China

Speaker: Zhang Ran(Peking University)

Abstract: We examine earnings informativeness of Chinese A-share market and find that Chinese A-share market is analogous to the U.S. market in terms of earnings value relevance and market responses to earnings information. More importantly, with the uniqueness of information disclosure and trading regulation, we show a striking phenomenon that overnight return at earnings announcement reacts efficiently to earnings and conveys relevant information for firm’s future fundamentals and stock return performances while intraday response solely adds noises to overall market response to earnings.  A long-short strategy based on this effect yields monthly alpha of 91.3 basis points.  Further analyses indicate that the phenomenon exists in other informational events such as management forecasts of earnings, and that the phenomenon is more pronounced in stocks that are associated with more retail investor trading.  Our results collectively support the usefulness of earnings in China and highlight the importance of the information conveyed by overnight trading in the unique setting.

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